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Millbrook High School Celebrates Class of 2022

Seventy two of Millbrook High School’s finest were the stars of the show when they graduated on June 24 during the annual commencement ceremony held at the Athletic Complex.

 

The Class of 2022, in its colorful caps and gowns, represent a diverse mix of talents, interests and abilities, hard-earned during four challenging but unique years. Keeping with tradition, 39 seniors graduated with advanced diplomas and 50 students received $80,000 worth of scholarships this year.

 

Keynote speaker MHS English teacher Frank Fiorenza, who is retiring this year, told the graduates that the content of their character is much more important in life than any failure or accomplishment.

 

“Who you are goes deeper than your grades, your college, your career,” Fiorenza said.

 

Referencing a quote from the movie “Shadowlands,” Fiorenza encouraged the students to follow the mantra of obtaining joy from desiring for something, rather than having it. 

 

“The wanting and trying give life meaning,” Fiorenza said. “The joy is the journey, please make it meaningful.”

 

The graduates will travel different routes with some worrying about making the wrong choice but Salutatorian Molly McMorris encouraged her fellow classmates to follow their curiosity just like Albert Einstein and Sally Ride did.

 

“You all have the potential to do profound things,” McMorris said. “Within each of you, is a spark of

curiosity that is waiting to ignite.”

Valedictorian David Sager compared his four years in high school to a bin of Legos that were jumbled at first with nothing built, but became assembled by senior year.

“The pieces have been assembled and now we have something complete,” Sager said. “The finished product we have here today is an achievement reflecting the time and energy we have all put in.”

Sager encouraged his fellow classmates to be the Lego piece they want to be in life because like the colorful bricks, every student has their own characteristics and qualities to offer.

“Whether it's kindness, a voice of reason, or even a little touch of crazy,” Sager said. “If there is one thing I have learned this past year, it’s that every group needs a little bit of crazy to spice things up.”